lamp Tag

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Pallet LED Lamp (Pallet Challenge) – Ep 034



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I made a Pallet Lamp with T8 LED tube. Enjoy!
Check out written tutorial on how to make this lamp:
https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-a-Beautiful-Pallet-Lamp/
and
http://www.hometalk.com/26037799/pallet-led-lamp

Sterling Davis’ channel:
https://www.youtube.com/user/SterlingsWoodcrafts

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Thanks for watching!

Page design: Barbara MT (my lovely wife)

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A look inside a 40W LED lamp with 660 LEDs.



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A very interesting lamp that uses a HUGE array of standard surface mount LEDs wired as 66 parallel strings of ten series LEDs. The use of multiple parallel circuits of ten LEDs seems to be a very common driving technique, as used in most of the 20-100W LED floodlights.
The driver is surprisingly chunky in this lamp, and has a lot of interference suppression circuitry on both the incoming mains and the outgoing DC to the LEDs.
Demo of lamp at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7Dq2myAN7Y
The main control chip is an SN03A driver chip dedicated to the function of driving LED lighting loads with very good power factor. It doesn’t seem to use significant smoothing on the incoming rectified mains, but rides the waveform, switching the transformer with a single MOSFET. The transformer has a second winding on the primary side to power the chip itself after it has started running. Current in the primary is monitored on each switching cycle via a sense resistor in series with the MOSFET.
There is opto-isolated feedback from the secondary side with efficient low-loss current detection being implemented using an LM258 op-amp. The secondary rectification and smoothing is based around a TO220 style diode package on a heatsink and two paralleled smoothing capacitors.
There is an auxiliary secondary winding on the transformer for a cooling fan (not fitted on this model), which uses a single rectification diode and a 22uF capacitor to create a simple unregulated DC supply.
The LEDs are probably run at a current of 1200mA split across 66 parallel circuits, giving a typical LED current of around 18mA.

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Fluorescent 18w vs. LED 10W – In Emersed Aquarium for growing plants



Fluorescent lamp tube vs Led light for freshwater aquarium plants – Growing emersed
This is my Emersed plant setup of Aquarium plants [One month old]
10W FloodLight LED Light vs. Fluorescent 18W Aquarium light
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TLNOVA LED LIGHT FACTORY VEDIO



ZHEJIANG TIANLONG OPTOELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. the professional manufacturer of LED Lightings, LED Bulb, LED Tube, LED Spotlight, LED Strip, LED Downlight, LED Panel Light ect. website is www.zjtl.cc, email [email protected], contact name Catherine.

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“Vintage” LED pygmy lamp string (with lamp schematic).



I got a couple of these 20 lamp festoons when they were available from a local shop a very long time ago. They proved to be a bit unreliable, but fortunately the lamps are easy to repair. In hindsight the “dead lamp” issue may have been the PCB touching the base and shunting that lamp out of the circuit.

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Making a DIY tubular glass LED filament lamp.



You can now support this channel at https://www.patreon.com/bigclive
I had some LED filaments left over from my big open filament lamp project, so I spontaneously decided to make a tubular LED filament lamp after discovering that test-tubes fit nicely into salvaged lamp bases.
Initially I was tempted to cheat with the absolute minimum number of components by using a single diode instead of a bridge rectifier, using a single current limiting resistor and omitting the capacitors discharge resistor, but then I decided to do it with a full circuit. This was a good approach because the circuitry is visible inside the glass tube and looks good.

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